Welcome to Kohnke’s Own

Equine Nutritional Supplements and Horse Care Products

Kohnke’s Ownยฎ, the range of products manufactured by John Kohnke Products, an Australian owned and based company, provides up-to-date supplement and horse care products, as well as a wide range of free information services to the horse industry.

Over the last 30 years, Dr. John Kohnke BVSc, RDA has become the most well known Australian veterinarian as an adviser on the nutrition and practical health care of horses.

Latest From Kohnke’s Own

Gastro-Coat Information Page

Kohnke’s Own Gastro-Coatยฎ is a natural supplement against Gastric Irritation in Horses.

To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

Gastric Ulcers In Focus

We are proud to present Equine Gastric Ulcers In Focus..

Our new animated video explains Gastric Ulcers and Gastric Irritation in Horses, and our supplement Gastro-Coat.

To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

#CelebrateHorses

For many horse owners, a most beloved horse can leave sweet memories forever in our lives. Your treasured first pony, your best friend for life or your competition companion.

This month on Kohnke’s Own Facebook Page we shared stories and memories of our most beloved horses. Read all of the fantastic stories and join in the fun yourself by clicking here.

Latest From Facebook

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Kohnke's Own at Boneo Park.

Kohnke's Own at Boneo Classic!
Come and say hi to the friendly team of Philippa and Kaye from Kohnke's Own plus the lovely Sarah from Pakenham Produce & Saddlery . We have a great trade stand at the event and are offering lots of information and of course, fantastic prices on Kohnke's Own supplements and health care products. If you purchase from our trade stand, or are competing at Boneo, you will get a voucher to enter our Boneo Classic competition, with 2 prize packs of $300 RRP of Kohnke's Own products to win! It looks to be a great weekend so share with your friends at Boneo.
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Elaine Forrest, Lauren Bannister and 23 others like this

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Kohnke's OwnHere is the poster with the entry details for the competition featuring the very talented Susan Elekessy and Don Rubin (Toby)!

2 days ago   ·  5
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Christine BrindleyWow great prize!! Someone will be very happy to win that ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜

2 days ago   ·  1

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Petra MarzHave a fantastic weekend guys. ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Amberley HealHave a great weekend ๐Ÿ™‚

2 days ago   ·  1

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Barb WrightFantastic trade stand. Cheery friendly faces.

2 days ago
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Is your horse affected by Anhydrosis?
The inability to sweat efficiently can be a major problem in horses housed or worked under hot, tropical conditions and is relatively common in Northern Australia. It does not develop under hot, dry conditions, so increased humidity appears to be a trigger factor. Horses under the stress of training and competition in these conditions can progressively lose their ability to sweat, developing into a more severe form of non-sweating disease or anhydrosis (spelt anhidrosis in USA). Anhydrosis also can affect humans under hot conditions.
Horses and humans are the only mammals which secrete sweat from skin glands as a means of evaporative cooling during exercise and hot weather. Sweating is an efficient form of thermoregulation, complemented by radiation, convection and lung cooling during respiration in working horses. The average 500kg horse has around 3.5 square metres of skin surface for the evaporation of sweat. The number, size and secretion rate of sweat glands decrease as anhydrosis develops. Some horses develop a partial degree of anhydrosis to become โ€˜shy sweatersโ€™, noticed as patchy sweating as sweat glands become inactive, whilst more severe cases, they cease to sweat and lose their primary cooling mechanism. In severe cases, the sweat glands shrink (atrophy), become inactive and never reactivate to resume sweat secretion. Some horses sweat under cooler winter conditions, but begin to sweat less as the heat and humidity of summer in Northern Australia and SE Asia increases. As humidity increases, the amount of sweat produced does not increase, but its evaporation rate from the skin is decreased, retaining more heat.

Major Signs of Anhydrosis
The symptoms progressively develop over 1-3 months as the ability to sweat decreases under hot, humid conditions. Up to 50-60% of horses develop the very early signs, including the โ€˜puffsโ€™ with increased shallow breaths under hot conditions during peak daytime temperatures, a loss of performance, often with increased panting and โ€˜blowing hardโ€™ during and after exercise, and less profuse sweating. As the condition develops, only patchy sweating occurs under the mane, on the front of the shoulders and flanks, eventually resulting in loss of the ability to sweat over the neck and remaining body surface. Panting after exercise to expel heat from the lung surface increases as the condition develops. Severely affected horses will stand in the shade or play in a water trough, whilst other less affected horses continue to graze.

Management and Therapy
The condition is usually managed by measures to reduce heat production and aid cooling, as treatment with drugs is largely unrewarding, although nutrient supplementation with electrolytes, vitamins and some amino acids may have some benefit. Although there are some nutritional remedies available, recent observations suggest that physiological salts combined with Vitamin E and Vitamin C are beneficial. A supplement, such as Kohnkeโ€™s Own Troppo-Saltsโ„ข containing Vitamin E, amino acids, Vitamin C and the salts of sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium, has been consistently successful in maintaining the ability to sweat in most horses. Being a concentrated salt mix, Troppo-Saltsโ„ข is supplemented at the rate of โ€˜scoop for scoopโ€™ with plain, fine table salt, which makes it very economical. In poor or โ€˜non sweatersโ€™, 2 scoops of Troppo-Saltsโ„ข and 2 scoops of salt combined daily have been helpful in maintaining sweating under hot, tropical conditions.

Dr. John Kohnke has written a handy factsheet on Anhydrosis with more information on chronic signs and extra management advice. Please message our Facebook page or email info@kohnkesown.com for a free copy.
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Ashlee Garran, Petra Marz and 23 others like this

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Petra MarzFantastic article John. Ever since we put Cadbury on Kohnke's Own CELL SALT, Cadbury has no problems dealing with long hot show and dressage days. Can highly recommend this product and best of all a tub will only set you back about $25 - great buy for a great result. ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š

2 days ago
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Catherine ThorpeJust started my mare on troppo today, been 12 years since she sweated, lucky to get a small amount in under her mane, so any improvement would be helpful.

5 days ago
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Lyndy McDonaldHi , I have just changed over to your Troppo Salt and was using Microbiotic salt as a combination but l see in your article that you suggest plain table salt.. Should l change to table salt??? Would love more info on Anhydrosis. Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚

2 days ago
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Shirley CallaghanMy horse is already on K O MagE. Can I sue Troppo-Salts with MagE?

4 days ago

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Alison YoungLiving in central Queensland troppo salts a must do. We use it every summer .๐Ÿ˜€๐Ÿด๐Ÿ‘

3 days ago
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Rebecca MajorDoes anyone know where in the lockyer valley, qld I can get this from??

22 hours ago
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Amberley HealSuch wonderful advice

5 days ago
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Robyn WalshDanielle Slade

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