Welcome to Kohnke’s Own

Equine Nutritional Supplements and Horse Care Products

Kohnke’s Own®, the range of products manufactured by John Kohnke Products, an Australian owned and based company, provides up-to-date supplement and horse care products, as well as a wide range of free information services to the horse industry.

Over the last 30 years, Dr. John Kohnke BVSc, RDA has become the most well known Australian veterinarian as an adviser on the nutrition and practical health care of horses.

Latest From Kohnke’s Own

Autumn Catalogue 2017

Kohnke’s Own is proud to present our Autumn 2017 Catalogue, full of useful tips and seasonal information for this Australian Autumn.

Click here to view the catalogue.

Gastro-Coat Information Page

Kohnke’s Own Gastro-Coat® is a natural supplement against Gastric Irritation in Horses.

To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

Gastric Ulcers In Focus

We are proud to present Equine Gastric Ulcers In Focus..

Our new animated video explains Gastric Ulcers and Gastric Irritation in Horses, and our supplement Gastro-Coat.

To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

Latest From Facebook

View on Facebook

Don’t know what to do? Ask your horse!
A recent study in the journal Animal Cognition assessed the changing behaviour of horses dealing with a caretaker that didn’t know where the treats were hidden. The horses in the study modified their behaviour towards their caretaker with an understanding of the human’s ignorance or awareness of the treat location.

The basic set-up of the experiment was quite simple but included many control situations. A helper allowed the horse to see a treat being hidden in a covered and unreachable bucket. When the caretaker stepped in, the horse increased their interactions with their caretaker, through touching and visual signals, if the caretaker didn’t know where the treat was hidden. As the authors of the study outlined, this shows that horses have an advanced cognitive ability to understand and react to a human’s knowledge state.

Does your horse tell you what to do? Let us know if your clever horse has developed ways to communicate with you and how they let you know what they want…

We have a proverb “ You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink” but horses may also have their own saying – “You can lead a human to the feed bucket, but you can’t make them hand it over!”

Ringhofer, M., & Yamamoto, S. (2017). Domestic horses send signals to humans when they face with an unsolvable task. Animal cognition, 20(3), 397-405.
... See MoreSee Less

Florence Yates, Lyn Savage and 46 others like this

View previous comments

Heidi SutherlandI have a cheeky spotted pony who will make it quite clear with body language and more front than Myers that he would like a scratch - then once you start, he turns his nose around and touches the area where he wants to be scratched. Sometimes it's spot on where he wants and sometimes he can't reach it with his nose, but he'll keep trying to show me until I get it!

22 hours ago   ·  4

2 Replies

Avatar

Jackie HayesI have a 'typical chestnut mare' that will literally shake her head "no" if I give her mixed signals with my hands when riding. Most challenging horse I've owned but really let's me know when I get it right

22 hours ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

Linda Anne GaultMine tell me bluntly they want gates opened by me for them. They look me in the eye and shove the chained gate with their chest or nose and then stare at me again. Three of my horses let me know when they don't want to be rugged, but will stand still to be rugged when it's cold enough for them. These photos are my lead horse telling me he isn't sure he trusts the new farrier lol

1 day ago   ·  7

1 Reply

Avatar

James SalzmanI have experienced similar behavior when cat-sitting and I didn't know where the bag of food was kept. I bustled around holding the empty food bowl and of course the cat meowed expectantly at me, but when it became clear that I was looking in the wrong place, the cat did signal that I should look under the sink, for example. (leading me, meowing over her shoulder, louder vocalizing etc). Anecdotal evidence isn't a repeatable experiment, but it did reinforce to me personally that I should listen carefully to animal communications as they really are attempting to tell us important information. 🙂

1 day ago   ·  5

1 Reply

Avatar

Lisa ConleyMy daughter's horse cracks us up. He'll turn around to scratch himself but it's only very brief because he's showing US where. We start and get the whole twisted lip thing, stop, he turns around and shows us the next spot 😂. This goes on for a while then we change sides and start the whole thing again! He's quite a chaacter...

1 hour ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Annette CondieMine is always asking for the gate to be opened to the big paddock. Sick of Jenny Craig paddock.

11 hours ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

Mandy N Steve ProbynI showed Mr Bazil Brush if he touched my cheek with his nose a treat came out of my pocket, now he touches everyone on the cheek expecting the same 😊

13 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Carol HollandYep, my young horse needs to be fed first or he plucks the mesh in his stable and stands on his tip toes on the edge of the step up out of the stable. The middle aged horse who was the youngest seems to roll his eyes in disgust. He was impatient too at the same age.

22 hours ago   ·  2

1 Reply

Avatar

Diane HummMine tells me if her water needs filling, if someone else feeds her she shows them where to put it, and she's quite clear about the rugs she likes to wear.

23 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Mandy EthertonMine are all very communicative. Not only do they demand scratches, ask to have gates opened, ask to have rugs on, and tell me if the water trough is empty, but some of them will also give me Yes/No answers to simple questions. The mare in my profile pic will nod her head and prick her ears for Yes. Last night it was, 'Do you want your neck rug on?' as it had almost stopped raining and her neck was already wet... She nodded yes. So I brought her the neck rug and she inspected it, and helped to me fasten it by holding her neck still until I'd don't the buckles up before she took another mouthful of her feed. One of my other mares generally doesn't like wearing rugs, but one day in particular, in January, her canvas rug was hanging on the gate where it had been for a month unused. At 7pm she saw me near her paddock, came and stood next to the rug on the gate, and I stopped to talk to her, and it wasn't until she actually touched the rug that I realized what she wanted. I didn't believe it as it was still 25 degrees, but she asked, so I obliged, and she stood stock still until it was fastened, then she calmly wandered away. Normally if she doesn't want a rug on she will leave at a trot and swish her tail in my face for good measure. Turned out she was right, that evening at sunset it turned cold, and we had heavy rain overnight and her paddock was the only one without a shelter. With my riding mare I have got it down to a fine art, she is subtle, so I have learned to observe her ears if the nod isn't forthcoming.... From 'listening' ears when I ask a question, both ears cocked back and nose turned slightly away is a definite No. One ear forward, one back means she's not sure, she either hasn't decided or needs more information to make a choice, two ears pricked forward is a clear Yes, and sometimes a little nod upwards for emphasis! So much fun learning their subtle communication cues, and I now have no doubt that they absolutely understand what we say to them! ☺️

4 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Stephanie GillespieThe more you listen, the more you hear 🙂

10 hours ago   ·  3

2 Replies

Avatar

Amberley HealVery interesting 😃

1 day ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Sarah Baldwinalong Tonia - it was really lovely to see you!

19 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

View on Facebook

Patella & Stifle Locking in Young Horses
Locking of the patella (also known as patella luxation) is relatively common in certain horse breeds, such as minis, but also can be due to poor nutritional balance in fast growing young horses, if they are not supplemented with extra nutrients to make up deficiencies in their natural diet.
The patella in the horse is equivalent to the kneecap in humans. The patella is held in a groove in front of the stifle joint to act as a ‘pully’ for an extensor tendon which passes over the stifle on its way to the lower limb. It can become loose in the groove and slip over the inside edge of the femur to become displaced on the inner border of the stifle, virtually preventing the stifle from bending and it ‘locks’ into a fixed position.
Once the patella slips to the inside, it ‘locks’ the stifle in position. The only way to ‘unlock’ the stifle is to push the animal to take one backward step, which straightens the stifle and enables the tendon and patella to ‘pop back’ into its normal position.

The Underlying Causes
There are 5 main causes of patella displacement in horses. It is thought that minis are more prone to the problem because their long limb bones are compact versions of taller horses and there is often a higher risk in minis with straight hind limb conformation.
• Genetic Tendency
• Strain of the Stifle Joint
• Low Selenium Diets
• Long Hind Toes
• Poor Hindquarter Muscle Development
• Rapid Growth Spurts

How can you help?
Investigation into an unusually high number of locking patella, both single and both limbs locking, in northern Tasmania which affected growing pony breeds and minis, linked soil deficiencies of the trace element selenium with the regional incidence of the problem. Many areas of Australia where high rainfall or a sand-dune base has reclaimed land, have selenium deficient soils. Besides increasing the risk of locking patella in young growing horses and ponies, low selenium levels in pasture, grain and hay grown on areas with a soil deficiency, can increase the risk of poor muscle development and muscle weakness (referred to as ‘White Muscle Disease’ in severe cases) and abnormal joint cartilage and tendon development in growing horses or the adult horse over an extended time on a low selenium diet.
It is well known that excessive toe length on the hind legs, combined with low heel conformation, is a common cause of locking patella in ponies and minis. Many horse owners report that the incidence of patella locking is reduced following each time the hind hooves are shortened, but that the problem returns as the toes grow longer towards the end of the regular 6 weekly hoof trim.
It is not uncommon for young Warmbloods and Thoroughbred yearlings to develop ‘clicking’ and locking patella if they have a growth spurt as a result of increased energy intake on good pasture or high energy hard feed, or ‘catch up’ growth after illness or an injury. Cutting back the energy intake and providing a balanced calcium, trace-mineral and vitamin supplement for growing horses, such as Kohnke’s Own Cell Grow, is recommended. Normally the growth plate enlargement on the stifle joint bones return to normal dimensions within 4-6 weeks and the ‘clicking’ sound at the walk and the patella locking ceases.

If you would like to “Invest in Future Success”, then request a FREE ration analysis for your young horse, pony or mini from the Kohnke’s Own team. We are happy to help you optimise the health, vitality and performance of your horse through a balanced diet. Message the Kohnke’s Own Facebook page, Freecall 1800 112 227 or email info@kohnkesown.com for more information
... See MoreSee Less

Greg McLaren, Kirstine Tonk Jensen and 37 others like this

View previous comments

Mandie HornerMy boys been on kohnkes own supplements since 6 mths(had him since 4 mths)...grazing is very poor quality....i took him off at 3 yrs old....but soon put him back on them...they worked wonders for him...so free moving...judges always comment how good he moves...and always in the ribbons...hes 4 yrs old now & just under saddle...and going great...

1 week ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Julie Scanlon BurkeKathy Scanlon interesting read. Now I understand what stifle lock is. Vet should have just said slipping patella.

1 week ago   ·  2
Avatar

Alexandra DeValentinSo timely! Seen like 40 ponies lately while looking for my little one's new steed and the majority have stifle issues.

1 week ago   ·  1
Avatar

Karen LeoncelliI have a 7yo with a clicking stifle. Could this help her?

1 week ago
Avatar

Angie SorensenIs there anything that can help supplement wise with an adult horse with this stifle lock problem

1 week ago
Avatar

Alexandra DeValentinSascha Laurenson - may explain Daisy's sudden improvement.

1 week ago
Avatar

Mandy N Steve ProbynKaren Morgan this article will be helpful

1 week ago
Avatar

Gail HackwillKerr

1 week ago
Avatar

Sylvia KingEmily King 🤔

7 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Katrina TurnerLarissa Bonehill

1 week ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Donna SampeyJodie Hayton

7 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Amy SwannellDavid Swannell read this

1 week ago
Avatar

Samantha WattBrigid Smith hmmmm

1 week ago
Avatar

Linda FryCatherine Harvey

1 week ago   ·  1
Avatar

Catriona McGuffickeSarah Ritzen

1 week ago   ·  1
Avatar

Alicia KathrynNicola Paisley

1 week ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sue KellLorraine Barton

7 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Susan PearceMegan Pearce

1 week ago   ·  1
Avatar

Karyn DelforceJenny McNab

1 week ago
Avatar

Jess WickhamCarl Green Grant N Tanya Wickham

1 week ago
Avatar

Katie SmithDeb Smith

1 week ago
Avatar

Rondel SorensenNatasha Gray

1 week ago
Avatar

Nicole BodnarCourtney Oxlee

1 week ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook