Welcome to Kohnke’s Own

Equine Nutritional Supplements and Horse Care Products

Kohnke’s Own®, the range of products manufactured by John Kohnke Products, an Australian owned and based company, provides up-to-date supplement and horse care products, as well as a wide range of free information services to the horse industry.

Over the last 30 years, Dr. John Kohnke BVSc, RDA has become the most well known Australian veterinarian as an adviser on the nutrition and practical health care of horses.

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To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

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We are proud to present Equine Gastric Ulcers In Focus..

Our new animated video explains Gastric Ulcers and Gastric Irritation in Horses, and our supplement Gastro-Coat.

To find out more about Gastric Ulcers in Horses and our supplement Gastro-Coat visit our new information web page by clicking here.

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This month on Kohnke’s Own Facebook Page we shared stories and memories of our most beloved horses. Read all of the fantastic stories and join in the fun yourself by clicking here.

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Warning: Stringhalt Season Returns
After another hot dry summer and with a few storms starting to come through, the flatweed that is responsible for causing pasture-associated stringhalt (PAS, formerly Australian Stringhalt) is flourishing. Because flatweed has green, succulent growth at the break of the season, it becomes very tempting for horses to consume as green grass is slower to revive. This ‘green pick’ encourages horses to seek out succulent flatweed and it is possible that they may also become addicted. Unfortunately, we are now getting reports from horse owners with cases of Stringhalt.

Pasture-associated stringhalt (PAS) is a seasonal condition caused by the ingestion of flatweed (Hypochaeris radicata). There is no strong evidence that ingestion of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) causes PAS. Flatweed and dandelion are difficult to distinguish and they are often found growing in the same area. This has implicated dandelion as being a possible cause of pasture-associated stringhalt in the past, but it is now believed that flatweed is the only culprit.

Pasture-associated stringhalt is caused by a nerve damaging chemical contained within the leaves of the flatweed, produced by the plant (MacKay et al, 2013), contrary to popular belief, it is not a mycotoxin. The chemical in the plant affects the peripheral nervous system, especially the long sciatic nerves of the hind limbs by stripping the protective myelin sheath along the nerves. When pasture becomes scarce, horses will start to eat the newly sprouted leaves of the flatweed. Signs of PAS may start to be noticeable within 7 – 21 days after consuming flatweed on a daily basis.

Symptoms of PAS vary depending on the extent of damage to the nerve sheath. In mild cases, you may only notice slight incoordination in one or both hind limbs as a horse is walked off. In moderate cases, some horses may present with exaggerated upper flexion action in one or both legs, especially when they become excited or anxious. In severe cases, a horse will display complete incoordination with an exaggerated gait, making it almost impossible to walk or back, especially off a horse trailer.
Early treatment is critical for faster recovery. Horses must be immediately removed from the affected pastures and placed in an area, such as a holding yard or another paddock, which does not contain flatweed. Dr. John Kohnke has worked with horse owners in Australia to help 100’s of horses with pasture-associated stringhalt and classic stringhalt over many years. He has found that supplementation with Kohnke’s Own® Mag-E® at double or even triple the normal dose for 7-10 days may help the recovery from stringhalt. Mag-E® helps to keep affected horses quiet and calm and reduces excitement which causes the characteristic ‘goose-stepping’ gait as the sciatic nerve impulses stimulate hindlimb muscle contraction. John has found that the unique combination of special ingredients in Mag-E has helped many PAS affected horses to regain normal nerve and muscle function. Other feeding tips include offering lucerne hay as it provides good quality protein for eventual myelin repair.

If you have a horse showing signs of PAS, we urge you to contact your veterinarian and remove your horse from paddocks containing flatweed. Early intervention is critical and if you need more information or advice, we invite you to contact our Kohnke’s Own Nutritional Advisors by messaging our Facebook page, emailing info@kohnkesown.com or Freecall to 1800 112 227. Karen, one of our Nutritional Advisors, is currently conducting a survey into previous PAS cases in Australia. If your horse(s) have previously suffered PAS, we would love to hear from you!
MacKay et al (2013). Toxicon 70:194-203.
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Kate Hartley, Vicki Wignell and 73 others like this

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Tish LyonMy older TB got PAS last year in January. He is finally finally starting to recover but his gait is still wrong. MagE seems to be what has aided his recovery

1 day ago   ·  2

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Lisa ColbranI have a boy with severe stringhalt at the moment... it's heartbreaking 😭

1 day ago

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Saad Almasoudi🌺🌺🌺thx

21 hours ago   ·  1

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Kate Palmer-KempsterCan you please post pictures of both flat weed and dandelion?

1 day ago   ·  1

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Kerry WolfeThank you

1 day ago   ·  1

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Tammie Anne OveryIs it ot only the leaves? We have it on out pasture and i pick it out but my horse doesnt seem to touch it. But my last lot of hay contains the steams and flowers . Very little leaf. But ive been going through ever dam biscuit of hay to remove as much as i can😣😥😦

1 day ago

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Katrina OsborneAllison Quinn fingers crossed for no stringhalt from anyone else this year!

1 day ago

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Bridget SchultzKathie Eastway we need to inspect the paddocks

1 day ago   ·  1
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Cheryl HeynemannMelissa Cardwell

1 day ago
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Sharon Adele LeppardIssy Leppard you have some of this and DB loves it

1 day ago
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Charlotte DarbyWarwick interesting

2 hours ago
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Lisa FalcinellaJane Giles check kallistos pasture

1 day ago
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Susanne NelsonNikki Teller....

1 day ago   ·  1
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Kylie SandfordElise Panetta

1 day ago   ·  1
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Emily FairbankNatasha May

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Natasha MayLisa Allan

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Have you joined the popular Talking Horse Health and Nutrition group on Facebook? With lots of great information and friendly members from all over the world, you can ask detailed questions, post pictures and connect with Kohnke’s Own Nutritional Advisors Sian and Karen. Our group Admin team includes Mel, an expert in pastures for horses and poisonous plants, Dr. Philippa Kohnke and Dr. John Kohnke. Members are encouraged to share their experiences and our Admins and Nutritional Advisors help to provide factual information and practical advice from their years of experience. Come and join the fun! ... See MoreSee Less

Jenni Bowman, Peta Paterson and 25 others like this

Cathy BuercknerI have found Karen to be incredibly helpful in regard to our donkeys. You provide a unique and very professional service to all, much appreciated!

1 week ago   ·  1

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Petra MarzWhat a brilliant opertunity to get the right advice and information from the experts. Thanks Kohnke's Own for setting this up. 😍😍😍

1 week ago   ·  1

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Amberley HealIt's a great group

1 week ago   ·  1

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Rebecca RichardsonI tried to join the group last night.. Filled out the form but no response from admin

2 days ago

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